First Level Character Generation
Part One; Race and Class

By Peter Haresnape

The Warriors released in the original game, subsequent Warrior Packs and articles, and in fan-made releases all had a fixed starting position. Two Warriors of the same type would be identical, with only a few potential differences in terms of spells or starting equipment. In order to allow a wider range of warriors, which can be designed from the ground up by individual players, I have put together some rules. The first part follows.

Choosing a Race

Of the many races in the Warhammer World, there are many choices. When designing a Warrior, you must first choose which race it is a member of. There is a choice of Human, Dwarf, Elf, Halfling or Ogre.

Human

The Humans are widespread, being found across the Old World and beyond. They comprise many powerful kingdoms, chiefly the coalition of states known as The Empire. Imperial Humans are the most advanced in many ways of the Human Kingdoms, and are at the forefront of the fight against Chaos, or so they assume.

Dwarf

The Dwarfs once ruled a mighty kingdom that stretched far along the World’s Edge Mountains, great mountain strongholds and deep mines and workshops. However, ruinous wars against Elves, Goblins, Scaven and the ravages of Chaos have eliminated fortress after fortress, in a slow degradation. Dwarfs are fine craftsmen and have a proud history.

Elf

Elves are also a race on the wane. Once mighty seafarers, sailing from the island-continent of Ulthuan, now they are insular and jaded, more concerned for their own pleasure than the outside world. Still, there are some that still go forth to explore. Also, there are the Wood Elves, a simpler race that is closer to nature. These are a race of fierce passions, and are excellent warriors against the evils of the world.

Halfling

Halflings are short and curious beings that have a natural tendency towards exploration and thievery. Although not brave as such, they have a certain resilience to evil, perhaps due to their simplicity of outlook. Halflings are good archers and scouts, but have a limited martial tradition. It is thought that all Halflings live in an area of the Empire called the Moot.

Ogre

Ogres originate to the east of the Empire, past the World’s Edge Mountains. They are strong, stupid creatures, but have a sort of cunning. Ogres tend to fight for a living, and their lives revolve around eating. Ogres are limited creatures, but can be mighty allies.

The player must decide which he wishes to take. It will determine which skills are easiest to attain, and what sort of warrior will develop, as well as what model to use.

Choosing a Class

Once the player has selected the race of his warrior, he will need to choose what job it will do. There are four specific classes.

Academic

The Academic Warrior is one that is learned and knowledgeable, and often wise. Generally, Academic Warriors have access to arcane powers or divine favour. However, they will not be the most effective killers.

Rogue

Rogue Warriors are highly useful to have along. Although not the most powerful of fighters, they have skills to pick locks, persuade, lay traps or bury a poisoned knife in a basilisk’s eye. The term ‘Rogue’ denotes many types of miscreants, all of them with their uses.

Fighter

Fighters are the most straightforward of Warriors. They are going into the dungeon to fight and make money, to slay evil and do good. Or vice versa. Fighters might be holy Paladins or mercenary Pit Fighters, but they are focused on fighting before all else.

Ranger

Rangers are the most flexible of Warriors. They are really a midpoint between Academic, Rogue and Fighter, having a mishmash of skills from each. Rangers could even develop arcane powers, or become deadly assassins.

NOTE:
Ogres cannot become Rogues or Academics. Not without looking silly.

Setting Statistics

Once the class and race is determined, it is time to decide the exact starting statistics. As well as determining how well the Warrior will be able to accomplish various tasks in the dungeon, Statistics (Stats) also make certain specialist skills available. For Warriors intending to fight a great deal, most of their points will be allocated here. Those desiring arcane power must only spend a portion of their allocation, reserving the rest for skills, later.

Movement (M)

Movement is generally set at 4. This simply reflects the number of spaces a Warrior may move each turn. Only Elves and Ogres may increase their Move, and only to 5.

Weapon Skill (WS)

Weapon Skill is the ability that a Warrior has with weapons. The higher it is, the easier it is to land a hit, and the harder it is for others to hit the Warrior. WS also affects skills like Parry.

Ballistic Skill (BS)

Ballistic Skill represents how easy it is for a Warrior to hit an enemy with a missile weapon like a bow or a simple thrown stone. BS is generally expressed as a value to score, for example 4+, meaning that it is a hit on a score of 4 or above on 1D6. However, during character creation, BS is a value like any other.

Strength (Str)

Strength is self-explanatory. As well as being the attribute by which many physical tests are determined, most weapons add the Strength of the Warrior to the damage.

Toughness (T)

The Toughness attribute is important in determining how much damage a Warrior can suffer. Against most attacks, the Toughness of the Warrior is deducted from the damage taken. It also affects skills like Ignore Blow.

Initiative (Init)

Initiative is the physical swiftness of the Warrior. Higher Initiatives give swift reactions and affect skills like Dodge. Initiative also determines how easy it is for a Warrior to move out of combat, in a similar way to the Ballistic Skill.

Attacks (A)

Most Warriors have but a single Attack. However, Elves and Ogres can gain an extra Attack, should they wish to. There are some skills that can increase the rate of attacks past the Statistic level.

Willpower (WP)

The Willpower Statistic shows the strength of the Warrior’s personality and the resilience of their spirit. A strong will allows them to hold firm to their course despite danger or distraction. Willpower can affect skills that resist magic, and affects Psychology.

Intelligence (Intel)

Intelligence represents what the Warrior knows. This is both actual knowledge and the rationality of mind that can solve puzzles. Intelligence is most important for Academic Warriors, but is fairly useless for most Fighters.

Each Warrior is given a number of points with which to improve on the basic profile. The cost of increasing a Stat is shown below, based on the race. In some cases, the starting Stat is higher, dependent on the race. This is indicated on the table by having a cost of ‘0’.

There are other modifiers than race. Academic Warriors gain +1 to Intelligence. Rogues lose –1 WP but gain +1 Initiative. Rangers gain +1 to both their BS and their Initiative. Fighters gain +1 to a Stat depending on their Race. Human and Ogre Fighters get +1 WS Elves, Dwarfs and Halflings gain +1 to their Strength. All of these bonuses are applied AFTER points have been spent to determine Stat levels, not before.

The following table can be used to determine the Stats for your new Character

 

+1

+2

+3

 

Base

H

E

D

O

Hl

H

E

D

O

Hl

H

E

D

O

Hl

M

4

-

4

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WS

2

3

1

3

2

3

5

3

5

4

6

-

6

8

7

-

BS

6+

3

1

2

3

0

6

3

5

6

0

-

6

-

-

3

S

2

3

3

3

0

3

5

5

5

3

-

-

-

8

6

-

T

2

3

4

0

0

4

6

7

3

3

-

-

-

-

7

-

Init*

2

3

0

4

4

0

7

0

8

8

4

10

4

-

-

7

A

1

-

6

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WP

2

2

2

0

3

3

3

4

2

-

6

4

6

4

-

-

Intel

3

2

2

2

5

2

4

3

3

-

4

6

5

5

-

6

*An Elf may take +4 in Initiative for a total cost of 6.

The number of points allowed depends on the race chosen. Ogres have 25 points, Halflings 15, and all others 20. These are counterbalanced by other rules that apply in later phases.

Once you’ve assigned as many points to Statistics as you want, you go on to use up any other points on Feats, Flaws and Foibles, and later on Skills. If you have no points left, you can gain some by taking Flaws. These will be covered in a later release.

Example

A Human Fighter with 20 points to spend

Stat

Base

New

Adjustment

Cost

Fighter Bonuses

M

4

4

None

0

0

WS

2

4

+1

3

+1

BS

6+

5+

+1

3

0

S

2

3

+1

3

0

T

2

3

+1

3

0

Ini

2

3

+1

3

0

A

1

1

None

0

0

WP

2

2

None

0

0

Int

3

3

None

0

0

Points

20

   

15

 

The Warrior could alternatively chose to spend a further 4 points increasing his Initiative a further +1, to 4. If he wanted to increase his Strength to 4, this would cost another 2 points. As it is, however, there are 5 points left to purchase skills.

17th February 2005
“Bigger Tables! Better Choices! More Rules!”